Few Researchers Consider the Effect of Hearing Loss in Physician/Patient Communication, NYU Study Finds

Few Researchers Consider the Effect of Hearing Loss in Physician/Patient Communication, NYU Study Finds April 5, 2017 | NYU Health and Medicine | See Original Here Of the 67 papers reviewed, only 16 (23.9%) included any mention of the effects that hearing loss can have on health care interactions. Doctors believe that communication with their patients is important, but most studies of physician/elderly patient communication do not mention that hearing loss may affect this interaction. The findings come from a review led by two NYU professors published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. Many researchers have explored communication between doctors and their patients, but how many of them have considered the importance of hearing loss? To investigate this question, a team led by Dr. Joshua Chodosh of New York University School of Medicine and Dr. Jan Blustein,  the NYU’s Robert F. Wagner School of Public Service and the School of Medicine, reviewed the published medical literature on doctor-patient communication, selecting research studies that involved patients aged 60 years and older. Of the 67 papers included in their study, only 16 (23.9%) included any mention of hearing loss. In some cases (4 out of the 67), people with hearing loss were excluded from the study. Three of the studies reported on an association between hearing loss and quality of care. In only one study did the researchers offer patients some kind of hearing assistance to see whether it would improve communication. (It found that offering hearing assistance improved patients’ understanding.) “Hearing loss has long been neglected in the medical community,” said Chodosh. “As a geriatrician, I see many patients...

You’re right, nobody listens to you — here’s why

You’re right, nobody listens to you — here’s why Jenna Goudreau | Jan. 14, 2016 | See Original Here We’ve become a nation of phone zombies with average attention spans of 8.25 seconds — less than a goldfish. The result? Already bad listening skills have gotten worse, and managers are no exception. According to ResourcefulManager.com, a website that offers advice and resources for managers, the average Fortune 500 manager scores a 2 out of 5 on listening abilities. There’s a cost: errors, miscommunication, wasted time, and employee turnover. ResourcefulManager created the following infographic to highlight the growing problem. ResourcefulManager.com SEE ALSO: These 2 words could reveal if you’re a bad listener NOW WATCH: 4 ways to make your workday more...

Are You Hearing This?

Are You Hearing This? Frank Lin’s research ties hearing loss to dementia, with big implications for public health: Unbundled, accessible audiology services and reimbursement for audiologic rehabilitation could be key, he says, to battling cognitive decline associated with hearing loss. Haley Blum – The ASHA Leader, June 2015, Vol. 20, 50-57. doi:10.1044/leader.FTR3.20062015.50 VIEW ORIGINAL ARTICLE Spend some time listening to Frank Lin talk about dementia, and you’ll never look at hearing loss the same way. Research by Lin and his team reveals a strong association between untreated hearing loss and the risk of cognitive decline and dementia in older adults—a link that poses big public health problems because of the aging population, says Lin, an associate professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, geriatric medicine, mental health, and epidemiology at Johns Hopkins University. As many as 5 million Americans age 65 and older have Alzheimer’s disease—just one specific type of dementia—and that number will increase significantly with current population trends, according to the National Institute on Aging, unless something’s done to treat or prevent it. Lin’s work focuses on three main questions surrounding the dementia-hearing loss link: What are the consequences of hearing loss (which affects about two-thirds of everyone older than 70) for older adults? Does treating hearing loss make a difference? And how do we address the issue from a big-picture, societal perspective? Lin, who will be the opening speaker at the research symposium during the ASHA 2015 Convention, spoke with the Leader about his work, the future of hearing health care and what that all means for older adults. Do we have any insights into the association...

Seahawks Win – Fans Lose for Winning

This past Sunday evening (9/15/13) was a special evening in Seattle-town. The Seahawks overpowered their opponent while the fans succeeded in setting a record for the loudest stadium in the world. The old record was set at the Ali Sami Yen Sport Complex Turk Telekom Arena in Turkey during a soccer match in 2011 – where the crowd set a record by recording a noise level of 130.2dB. Seattle fans, not to be outdone, upped the level to 130.9dB – a truly ear-splitting record. But while the Seahawk fans, better known as the 12th Man, succeeded in making the most noise, many, if not all of them will suffer later on for their effort. Noise induced hearing loss is at epidemic levels in this country with one out of five Americans over the age of 12 having a hearing loss severe enough to cause difficulty in their communication. This incredible number, 20%, is the result of our extremely noisy society. Sensorineural hearing loss is caused by our ears being exposed to noises in excess of what our ears can handle. We might believe that our attendance at events where noise prevails (stadium events, rock concerts, noisy restaurants, etc.) won’t hurt us, but the fact is that noise induced hearing loss – one of the primary components of sensorineural hearing loss category – builds up over time and is not reversible. Most people lose their hearing very slowly. So slowly in fact, that for most people, it takes almost a decade between when they begin to feel that they have a hearing loss until they decide that its time to...