You’re right, nobody listens to you — here’s why

You’re right, nobody listens to you — here’s why Jenna Goudreau | Jan. 14, 2016 | See Original Here We’ve become a nation of phone zombies with average attention spans of 8.25 seconds — less than a goldfish. The result? Already bad listening skills have gotten worse, and managers are no exception. According to ResourcefulManager.com, a website that offers advice and resources for managers, the average Fortune 500 manager scores a 2 out of 5 on listening abilities. There’s a cost: errors, miscommunication, wasted time, and employee turnover. ResourcefulManager created the following infographic to highlight the growing problem. ResourcefulManager.com SEE ALSO: These 2 words could reveal if you’re a bad listener NOW WATCH: 4 ways to make your workday more...

Listening to Learn in a Sea of Noise: The Insidious Effects of Classroom Acoustics on Student Performance

There is no question that if a school had poorly lit classrooms that there would be an outcry and a demand to improve lighting so that children could clearly see to learn. Substandard classroom acoustics are not as obvious as the lighting analogy above although the effects of poor classroom listening may be even more significant than those caused by poor lighting. It is an assumption in education that children who are paying attention in the classroom will be able to easily hear what the teacher says, and thereby learn. For too many children, this assumption is untrue. Realities of Classroom Acoustics Appropriate acoustic treatment in classrooms costs 1%-5% of the typical construction budget of a new school – less than the landscaping. In general, providing appropriate classroom acoustics is not a considered a priority. National standards for classroom acoustics were established by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) in 2002. Research indicates that only 10%-30% of classrooms meet these standards In a national survey of schools almost 30% of classrooms were judged to be too noisy by educators. The students who are most challenged by excessive noise and reverberation are under the age of 13, especially those in kindergarten and first grade. The auditory physiology that allows humans to effectively listen in relatively noisy conditions does not mature until secondary school, with some aspects not maturing until the end of high school. Our youngest students are also those with immature language learning and lack the words needed to expertly fill in the blanks when a new word or word ending is missed. Because adults are so much better...

A Poem on Listening Disorders by Erin Anderson

I want so badly to be here now, to grab the moment and hold on. I promise I’m doing my best as I try to silence my loud thoughts. I want nothing more than to listen, to truly conceptualize the story you are telling. I strive to capture the power of your beautiful words. I have worked tirelessly to train my wandering eyes- but my mind is a beast I have failed to tame. I want you to know how deeply I long to be here with you, to pay you the attention you deserve. But my restless brain has chosen me as her travel companion, and she does not take kindly to rejection. written by Erin Anderson – posted with permission...