Childhood cancer can cause a lifetime of listening difficulties

September is Childhood Cancer Month. Hearing the diagnosis that your child has cancer is brutal, to say the least, and from the outside, it seems that the treatment is worse than the disease. Pediatric oncologists use everything they have in trying to save the child’s life. The spectrum includes chemotherapy, surgery and/or radiation. It is difficult to watch a child go through chemotherapy. The drugs that kill the cancer comes close to killing the child. The side-effects include neutropenia (reduced white blood cell count) which reduces the child’s ability to ward off infection, peripheral neuropathy which can cause extreme pain and/or loss of feeling and tingling in the fingers and toes, loss of taste buds so that food has no taste and is not desired, and extreme fatigue. Radiation has its own set of side-effects that include fatigue and skin rashes and burns in the targeted area. Most if not all of these side-effects will disappear within a few weeks or months after the end of treatment. One side-effect that might not begin to appear for years after treatment is hearing loss and other listening disorders. Depending upon the chemo agents used and the length of treatment, hearing loss can range from mild to severe.  Radiation, if the tumor is in the head or neck area, can create additional damage to the cilia within the cochlea. A child with listening problems, be they based on physical, cognitive, or treatment-based reasons, can suffer a lifetime of difficulties. Listening disorders have an impact on learning, communication, school performance, social interaction, and overall quality of life. Listening disorders can lead to academic...

So THAT’S the reason! A common but little-known condition could explain why your partner ignores you

So THAT’S the reason! A common but little-known condition could explain why your partner ignores you By Julie Cook For The Daily Mail | 08:51 EST, 14 February 2018 | See Original Article Here Listen up: Auditory processing disorder is a problem with how the brain interprets sound Ask 14-year-old Pippa Marchant to describe the machine that washes clothes and she might pause, then say: ‘The shaky-shaky thing.’ She knows what it is really called, but she can’t find the word. Because Pippa has a condition called auditory processing disorder, or APD. APD is essentially a problem with how the brain interprets sound. It may explain why some people struggle to hear speech in a noisy restaurant and could even be the reason your spouse seems to ignore you. Listen up: Auditory processing disorder is a problem with how the brain interprets sound People with APD find it hard to distinguish between very similar words or sounds. Unlike with typical hearing loss, in APD sounds reach the brain — people with the condition hear them, but find it difficult to process them. This means APD is hard to diagnose, as standard hearing tests rarely pick it up. ‘I’m sure there are thousands of children and adults in the UK who have not been correctly diagnosed,’ says Dr Ralph Holme, director of biomedical research at Action on Hearing Loss. CHILDREN CAN BE MISDIAGNOSED In cases where an adult has it but was never diagnosed, people might think of them as rude or unresponsive. Family members may complain about being ignored while, say experts, the person with APD may become anxious or...

A Poem on Listening Disorders by Erin Anderson

I want so badly to be here now, to grab the moment and hold on. I promise I’m doing my best as I try to silence my loud thoughts. I want nothing more than to listen, to truly conceptualize the story you are telling. I strive to capture the power of your beautiful words. I have worked tirelessly to train my wandering eyes- but my mind is a beast I have failed to tame. I want you to know how deeply I long to be here with you, to pay you the attention you deserve. But my restless brain has chosen me as her travel companion, and she does not take kindly to rejection. written by Erin Anderson – posted with permission...