Hearing loss can be very isolating, hurting relationships with family and friends

By Consumer Reports February 17 at 2:00 PM | See Original Article Here Consumer Reports has no financial relationship with any advertisers on this site. We’ve known for a while that hearing loss can increase the risk of depression and issues related to concentration and memory, and possibly even dementia. Now, mounting research, including a recent British review of studies, suggests that hearing problems can take a significant toll on relationships with spouses, children, friends and ­co-workers. “Hearing loss is a family issue, not just an individual one,” explains Catherine Palmer, director of audiology and hearing aids at the University of Pittsburgh, who was not involved in the British research. “It’s long been understood that a person with hearing loss may start to withdraw from social situations, but there’s been less focus on the effects on their partners — the social isolation as well as the burden of being a loved ones ‘ears.’ ” Here’s what to know about this research and how to curb social problems related to hearing loss. What the research shows The research, conducted at the University of Nottingham and published in the journal Trends in Hearing, looked at more than 70 previous studies on the complaints made by people with hearing loss and those closest to them. “We found that hearing loss impacted people’s social relationships in all facets of their life,” says lead study author and audiologist Venessa Vas. “Oftentimes, both parties became depressed and socially withdrawn.” Spouses, in particular, reported feeling anxious and stressed about their partners’ hearing loss. “The whole process is draining for them, as they often have to serve as another set...

You’re right, nobody listens to you — here’s why

You’re right, nobody listens to you — here’s why Jenna Goudreau | Jan. 14, 2016 | See Original Here We’ve become a nation of phone zombies with average attention spans of 8.25 seconds — less than a goldfish. The result? Already bad listening skills have gotten worse, and managers are no exception. According to ResourcefulManager.com, a website that offers advice and resources for managers, the average Fortune 500 manager scores a 2 out of 5 on listening abilities. There’s a cost: errors, miscommunication, wasted time, and employee turnover. ResourcefulManager created the following infographic to highlight the growing problem. ResourcefulManager.com SEE ALSO: These 2 words could reveal if you’re a bad listener NOW WATCH: 4 ways to make your workday more...